Categories

Kitemare Loading... Please wait...
Questions? Call 888-812-7434 Kitemare.com Christmas Specials
Trainer Kites, Kiteboarding, Landboarding, Snowkiting

I'm new! I'm looking for a trainer kite...

I'm looking for a beginner, entry-level power kite for...

I'm looking for a board...

Kitemare Savings

Categories

Trainer Kite Reviews

Got kiteboarding or snowkiting fever... and sick of watching?

A trainer kite is the place to start! But which trainer kite? 

When it comes to trainer kites, one size doesn't fit all.  Let us help you find a trainer kite that fits you perfectly, so you can learn the important kite flying skills that it takes to be successful in kiteboarding, landboarding, and snowkiting.

trainer kites

I'm looking for a trainer kite that fits me... (select below)

I WANT... a trainer kite that is SIMPLE & EASY to fly.

Trainer Kites - Kitemare.comWhat Does Simple & Easy Mean?

  1. Simple Self Relaunch - There is nothing more frustrating than not being able to relaunch your kite after it crashes. 3-Line trainer kites are the simplest kites to launch and relaunch by yourself. Relaunching is almost automatic.
  2. Easy Set Up -  The trainer kite should come ready to fly. All of our 2 and 3 line trainer kites come complete with everything you need and are ready to fly.
  3. Crash Proof Quality - Who wants a kite that is going tear or blow a seam? Your kite is going to take some major abuse and some pretty big power crashes. You want a trainer kite that is going to be strong and hold up to this abuse.

5 Great Simple Trainer Kite Brand Options

Trainer kites come in different sizes. So, choose the size based on the amount of power that you want. The bigger the power, the bigger the pull.

Trainer Kite Simple Power Graph

Introducing the NEW Single Skin Kites:  Peter Lynn UNIQ.  These kites are awesome for light wind areas. These are high quality, durable kites with a great price point!  Call us if you want to learn more about the advantages of a single skin kite!

Basic Differences Between the Kites

I WANT... a trainer kite for a BIG GUY.

Kitemare Big Guy Trainer KitesWhat Does I’m a "Big Guy" Mean?

When talking on the phone I am not sure what some people mean when they say they are a “big guy”. This could mean different things to different people. With kiteboarding, we consider a big person to be a rider who weighs somewhere between 200lbs to 270lbs.

Are There Kiteboarding Size Restrictions?

Manufacturer specs and charts regarding kite size, wind range, and board size are normally based on a rider who weighs about 165 to 175lbs. Most manufacturers limit their gear to a maximum weight of 275lbs.

“Big Boy” Myths

Myth #1 – Big People Can't Kiteboard

There are a lot of big people who learn to kiteboard. Yes, there are certain challenges and considerations, but big people can learn and have a blast learning both kiteboarding and snowkiting.  

Myth #2 – Big Boys Need a Big Trainer Kite

Regarding a trainer kite, a bigger size is not necessarily required, especially if other people, such as family and friends, are going to fly the kite. For actual kiteboarding or snowkiting, the size of the kite will be important, and a bigger kite will be needed for bigger people.

What Size Trainer Kite Does a Big Person Need?

Tip #1 – Keep The Main Thing The Main Thing

Learning power kiting skills with a trainer kite is all about learning the kite flying basics of kite control, muscle memory, the wind window, wind conditions, and learning to evaluate your environment.  It is less about the power of the kite and more about proper control. A trainer kite from 2.5 to 3.5 square meters is a great size for training, learning kite control, and building good kiting habits.

Tip #2 – Will Other People Fly the Kite?

Many times, flying a kite becomes a people magnet. So, ask yourself, are family and friends also going to fly your kite or are you buying just for yourself? If you also want others to fly the kite, then go with a kite size that would be appropriate for them or somewhere in between.

Tip #3 – With Light Wind, Trainer Kite Size Is Not So Important

Even a 4m kite will only generate moderate power in light wind. However, as the wind increases above 12mph, the power and pull will multiply much quicker with any kite larger than 2.5 square meters. So, think about the little person if a little person is going to fly with you.

Tip #4 – When is a Bigger Kite Better?

If the kite is just for you and you want a kite for both training and introducing yourself for snowkiting or body dragging in the water, then a larger size is better.

You also may want to consider moving up to a 4-line depower kite between 4m to 8m. 

Suggested Trainer Kites for Big Guys

Trainer Kites for Big Guys

 

Introducing the NEW Single Skin Kites:  Peter Lynn UNIQ.  These kites are awesome for light wind areas. These are high quality, durable kites with a great price point!  Call us if you want to learn more about the advantages of a single skin kite!

 

Basic Differences Between the Kites

4-Line Depower Kites To Consider

I WANT... a trainer kite with POWER!

Trainer Kite - Bigger Power There are some folks who like to push the limits and are looking for a bigger punch!  This is great, but here's some helpful advice on power:

Tip #1– Mastering Kite Control is What's Most Important!

Learning power kiting skills with a trainer kite is all about learning: The key to learning power kiting skills with a trainer kite is building a strong understanding of kite control, muscle memory, wind window, evaluating your environment, and understanding wind conditions.

When learning to fly a kite, you don't want crazy, out-of-control flying.  You need to learn controlled and calculated moves. This will only create bad habits.  When you advance to a full-sized kite, uncontrolled flying can be extremely dangerous. That's why you need a kite that you can easily control as you learn the basic moves and key kite-flying maneuvers.  This will develop important safe natural responses and muscle memory.

Tip #2 – What Size Trainer Kite Can I Learn the Basic Skills But Still Have Power?

A trainer kite from 2 to 3 square meters will work great for the #1 purpose of learning kite flying skills. A trainer kite that is 2.5m to 3m in size is a nice balance of power and performance.

Tip #3 – Flying a Bigger Trainer Kite With More Power Can Be A Lot of Fun For the Right Person

I don't recommend a large power kite for a light person without experience.  Size does play a part in the choice of a kite. If you're a regular-sized to larger-sized person, a larger kite will add more challenge and fun to the adventure.  Whereas, a smaller person can have just as much challenge with a 2m to 2.5m kite. 

Kite power is based on 2 things:  Primarily wind speed, but also a person's size to be able to handle the kite.

Tip #4 – The Bigger Power Peter Lynn Skim Kites and the Hydra II Kites Can Be Used on Water

Peter Lynn Skim kites and the HydraII kites are the only trainer kites that can also be used in the water.  If you have a big enough kite, a board, and strong enough wind, you can also learn some board and water skills, including body dragging.

Trainer Kite - 4 Line Rush V SchoolTip #5 – You May Want to Consider a 4-Line Sheetable Trainer Kite

4-line sheetable kites will have more power because of the way they are designed, but are more difficult to set up.  4-Line trainer kites rig and fly much like a regular sized kite.  If you want to know if a 4-line is a good choice for you, give us a call, and we can provide more details.

Trainer Kites that are Super-Strong, Durable, & Deliver Power

Trainer Kite Power Graph 

 

Fixed Bridal Trainer Kites with Power (easy to set up, comes complete to fly)

4-Line Depower Beginner Kites with Power (bigger kites that rig & fly like a full-size kite)

I WANT... a FAMILY-FRIENDLY trainer kite.

Kitemare Family Friendly Trainer KitesFamily-Friendly Kites

Kites used for kiteboarding and snowkiting have become much safer and user friendly over the years.  The stability of the kites, safety systems, and depower mechanisms have dramatically improved as well. This means that kiteboarding has also become a fun family sport.

Specialized Instructors for Young People

Some kiteboarding schools now have instructors that specialize in teaching young people.  Kiteboarding and snowkiting can be an excellent family adventure.

The cool thing is if you live in snow country, many young people are light enough that a trainer kites can also be used for snowkiting.

Tips for Choosing a Family-Friendly Trainer Kite

Tip #1 – Safety First!

Children should always be accompanied by an adult.  Children should never be left flying a kite alone.

Tip #2 – Be Cautious of Higher Winds

As winds increase above 10 mph, the power and pull a trainer kite will generate will multiply much quicker with any trainer kite over 2m.  A kite under 2m will increase in power more gradually and only produce moderate pull.

Tip #3 – Choosing Trainer Kites Specifically for Lightweight Kiters

A trainer kite ranging from 1.5m - 2m is a good kite choice for lightweight children in light winds. A 2m - 2.5m trainer kite is good for older teens and lighter weight adults in light to moderate winds.

Tip #4 – Wind Speeds for Lightweight Kiters

Wind speeds will have the biggest impact on a kites power / pull. We recommend flying in winds ranging from 6 to 10 mph.

With winds below 10 mph, both smaller and larger (2.5 - 3.5m) kites will only produce a light to moderate pull. When the wind increases above 10mph, the power and pull will multiply much quicker with these larger size kites.

Tip #5 – Line Configuration for Lightweight Kiters

3-line or 2-line trainer kites are the most popular and simplest to fly.  Both 3 and 2 line trainer kites can be equally durable and fly almost the same.  2-line kites are the least expensive and offer smaller sizes.  However, 3-line trainer kites are the easiest to relaunch, and have better depower function.  3-line trainer kites are the most popular among adults and teenagers. 

Kites for Children & Young People

Trainer Kites - Kids Power Graph 

 

Basic Differences Between the Kites

3-Line Trainer Kites for Children (Lightest Power Options)

3 Line Kites for Lighter Teens & Adults (Under 110lbs)

2 Line Kites for Children (Light Power)

2 Line Kites for Lighter Teens & Adults (Under 110lbs)

I WANT... a trainer kite I can use in the WATER.

Trainer Kite Choices for the Water

3 Line Trainer Kites for Water & Land

These kites are a great choice!  They are high quality, extremely durable, water relaunchable kites.  The Skim is a 3-line trainer kite that can easily be relaunched, even from the water, making it perfectly suitable for those body dragging sessions to get used to controlling a kite while in the water.   The Skim has a big wind range which makes it an excellent kite to make quick progression with. It flies very easy going in light winds, so beginners feel safe and confident flying it, but it also performs very well in high winds, where the Skim is easily powerful enough for some body dragging fun.

This is a simple-to-use and popular water relaunchable kite.  These kite are excellent kites in water where the waves are not too big.  Bigger waves that might crash into the kite have the potential of water logging or damaging the kite. Areas with smaller waves, and flat water are great environments for this type of kite.   The kite is super easy to relaunch and makes an excellent kite for introducing new kiters to power kiting and body dragging.


4 Line Depower Kites for Water & Land

Sizes: 2.5m, 4m, 6m, 8m

This is one of the most versatile, highest quality, easy to use 4-line depower beginner kites on the market. Whether you are looking to learn kiteboarding or snowkiting or both, this kite is an excellent choice. The kite is a super-high quality closed cell foil that is specifically designed for new kiters. The different sizes offer a huge range of potential. If kiteboarding is your ambition, this kite is fantastic. The kite is sold with the control bar and lines. The lines can be shortened to half length for your first practice sessions, making your first flights safer with less power. The lines can be quickly lengthened to the full length when you are ready for full power. For water and snow snowkiting, this kite is one of the best tools for learning and progressing in the sport.

The Ocean Rodeo is a nice little package that comes complete with everything needed to fly the kite. It is a close simulation of rigging and flying full size gear. Like other 4 - line inflatable kites (LEI – Leading Edge Inflatable kites), launching, landing, and relaunching will take the help of an assistant. Under the right conditions you will be able to learn to self launch, land, and relaunch. This is a great learning package that is affordable and safely introduces you to rigging and flying full size gear.


2 Types of Trainer Kites that Can Be Used on Water

1. Closed Cell Foil  3 Line Trainer Kites  (Super easy to set up and fly)

Land, Water, & SnowKitemare.com Trainer Kites for Water

In a nutshell, a closed cell foil kite allows the air to blow into the kite, but when it crashes internal sock(s) trap the air in and keep the water out.  The kite will float on the water like a blown up plastic bag.  These kites are 3-line kites and are very user friendly and easy to relaunch.

Come complete & ready to fly – No Extra Gear Required

2. Inflatable (LEI) 4-Line Trainer Kites (Rigs & flies like a full-size kite)

Water, Snow, &  Limited LandFlysurfer Viron Beginner Kite

An inflatable 4-line trainer kite rigs and flies just like full size gear.  Ultimately, these kites are designed for water and are great for practice sessions in the water.

Inflatable trainers are not for everyone, but for the right person it can be a great tool for learning.  These trainer kites allow a new kiter to learn each step of the flying process; from setting up, launching, flying, landing, and packing your kite away just like a full size kite.

 

Considerations Before Buying a 4-Line Inflatable Trainer Kite:

  • Cost -  Inflatable trainer kites are more expensive and most require additional gear.  The good thing is, the additional gear required (harness and bar) can be the same gear you will use with a full size kite.
  • Set Up - An inflatable 4-line kite will take more time to set up and learn to fly.
  • Launching - They will be more difficult to launch, land, and relaunch by yourself.  When learning, inflatable kites will require the help of an assistant.  As you advance, you will be able to learn how to self launch, water relaunch, and land your kite by yourself.  So, this can be done, but it will take practice.  In moderate to high winds, it is always recommended to launch and land your kite with an assistant.
  • Flying - A 4-line trainer kite has the added characteristic of sheeting in and out when flying.  This will confuse some people who do not have the proper instruction or understand how sheeting in and out affects steering, increasing power, decreasing power, stalling, launching, relaunching, etc...  It is not difficult to learn, but developing bad habits is not good.
  • Crashes - For new kiters, power crashes are going to happen.  When you are flying on land you will want to avoid areas with sharp objects (ie. sticks, or crusty, icy snow).  Any sharp objects will have the potential of poking a hole in the bladder of the kite.
  • Hooked In - 4 line kites require that the kite pilot be hooked into a harness to fly.  This adds to the risk of injury and requires a complete understanding of the safety systems.
  • Lessons - We strongly recommend taking at least a land lesson for safety purposes and also learning how to properly set up, launch, and fly a 4-line sheetable kite.  

Note:  These considerations are not meant to be negative, but are characteristics that come with flying a 4-line sheetable kite.  Some newbies will find them frustrating if they do not have the proper training or the help of an experienced kiter.

I WANT... a LESS EXPENSIVE trainer kite.

Petery Lynn UNIQ Single Skin Trainer KiteStrong and Durable 3 Line, Less Expensive Trainer Kites 

If you're looking for a less expensive, yet high quality, 3-line trainer kite, the Peter Lynn UNIQ kites are a great solution. For about $50 more than a 2-line kite, you have the added bonus of the third line for easier relaunching of the kite.                 

2 Line Trainer Kites: The Least Expensive Option

If you're looking for a less expensive trainer kite option, a 2-line trainer kite is your answer.  These trainer kites don't have the additional perks that 3-line trainer kites have, however, if you're on a tight budget, then it will do the job.

Features of 2-Line Trainer Kites

  • Kitemare 2-Line Trainer KiteAre more difficult to self-relaunch compared to 3-Line Trainer Kites
  • Are all open foil kites designed for land use only
  • Come in smaller sizes
  • HQ Rush & Crazyfly Sensei are extremely durable 2-Line Trainers

Differences in 2-Line Trainer Kites

Kites like the HQ Rush or Crazyfly Sensie are extremely durable (like 3-line kites) and cost $150 to $200+.  The HQ Fluxx offers smaller sizes that sell for under $100.

2-Line trainer kites are all open cell foil kites and are designed for land use only. They will not relaunch off the water.

Strong and Durable 2 Line Trainer Kites                   

Least expensive 2 Line Trainer Kites– Not as Durable – Note: Any kite Under 2m is a really small kite.

I WANT... a trainer kite/beginner kite that can also be used for SNOW KITING.

Kitemare SnowkitingWhy Snowkiting?

Snowkiting is a great way to enter the world of power kiting sports.  It's easier to learn than kiteboarding. 

5 Things That Make Snowkiting Simple to Learn

  1. Land – The fact that you are standing on land and flying on a solid surface makes learning much simpler.  No waves, no floating down wind, no deep water starts... just put your kite up and go.
  2. Type of Kite – Both foils and inflatable kites are great for snowkiting.  If you are interested in kiteboarding, you can use the same inflatable kites for snowkiting.  If you're not interested in kiteboarding you may decide to go with a foil kite.  
  3. Kite Size – You don't need as large of a kite with snowkiting.  For example, a core size kite for a 170lb person for kiteboarding would be a 12m kite.  For snowkiting, the core size kite may be an 8m kite.  For a beginner, you can start learning with a kite as small as 4m - 6m.
  4. Cost – Snowkiting is less expensive than kiteboarding because it doesn't require as large of a kite.  Not only can you purchase a smaller kite, but you most likely already have skis or a snowboard, so all you need to purchase is the kiting gear.  There are two avenues you can choose for kiting gear: 
    1. Option #1 – Least expensive ($300 to $400) - 3 or 4 line fixed bridal kites can be used without having to buy any additional gear.  A kite harness is not required but can be added.
    2. Option #2 -  More expensive option ($800 to $1,500) -  4 or 5 line depower kites that you would need to purchase along with the complete gear.  Kiting gear includes:  kite, control bar, leash, and harness.   If you are already equipped for kiteboarding, you don’t need to buy any extras unless you don’t own a snowboard or pair of skis.
  5. Locations – Whereas kiteboarding is restricted to ocean coast lines, great lakes, and large in-land lakes. snowkiting is wide open to anybody who lives in snow country.  Frozen lakes and snow-covered fields can easily become excellent snowkiting playgrounds.  No hills required.


What Kind of Kite Do You Need to Get Started?

A common question we are often asked is… Can a trainer kite be used for an entry level snow kite? Good question.

There is not a straight answer to this question. Your environment, wind speeds, weight, skills, budget, and your level of interest are all factors that impact what size kite you need and the type of kite that will be the best fit for you. Most importantly, you want a kite that won’t waste your money or your time, and will help you learn to fly safely.

Unlike kiteboarding, with snowkiting you can start with a smaller kite size and work up. For example, with kiteboarding, you begin with a core size kite for your weight and average wind conditions. The kite size for a 170 lb person in winds ranging from 12mph to 18mph would be about a 12m kite. This is the size required to generate enough power and speed for getting up, planing off, edging, and flying upwind.

With snowkiting, you are on a solid surface. Most snowkiting is also done in an area that is hard packed snow and not deep powder snow. This allows for a much smaller kite when learning. You can safely start with a 4m or 6m kite and progress from there.


Understanding Kite Size

Kitemare Snowkiting Chart

The above chart provides a general perspective of how kite sizes may be categorized for the average person learning to snowkite in moderate winds.

  • Moderate winds being 12mph to 20mph
  • Average weight of 170 lbs
  • Hard packed snow with less than a few inches of powder

A person's weight, personality, physical condition, skillset, wind speeds, surface type, and the environment can all play a role in the kite you choose for snowkiting.

Smaller size kites can be a great way to introduce yourself to the sport of snowkiting. For a beginner snowkiter, a person weighing 120 – 200lbs, a 3m to 6m kite may be the appropriate size to start out with given the right wind conditions and environment. We have many customers who start with a 4m to 6m kite and continue to use them even after they upgrade to a larger, more expensive kite.

Kiting lessons are always recommended before flying larger kites. Larger kites can quickly become dangerous. Always follow the instruction manual and only use a kite according to the manufacturer’s instructions and intent.


2 Types of Kites to Consider for Snowkiting

Option #1: Fixed Bridal Kites

These are the least expensive option. These kites are a good choice for light to medium weight riders and for anyone who just wants to “kick the tires” and explore their interest in the sport.

  1. Fixed bridal kites can be flown with or without a harness. They are most often flown without a harness.
  2. Fixed bridal kites large enough for snowkiting are normally 3 line, or 4 line kites.
  3. These kites can make a great beginner kite for a small amount of money.
  4. Almost all fixed bridle kites come complete and ready to fly. The control bar is always included with the kite. The average fixed bridal kite appropriate for snowkiting may cost between $200 to $600.
  5. These kites have no ability to sheet-in or sheet-out, there is no de-power line, and the pull of the kite is all on the bar.
  6. If you would like to add a harness, the additional cost would be between $170 to $250.


Option #2 Depower Kites

These kites are going to be more expensive. They are the real deal and may be the best option for those who are serious about learning and progressing in the sport of snowkiting.

  1. 4-line (or 5-line) depower / sheetable kites are the real deal. These kites are the type of kites used for kiteboarding and snowkiting.
  2. They can either be foil kites or inflatable (LEI) kites.
  3. Depower / Sheetable kites will require some additional gear. For snowkiting, a complete kite package would include the kite, control bar, harness, and a leash. Each item is normally purchased separately. The only exception is with foil kites. With foil kites, sometimes the control bar is included with the kite and other times it is not.
  4. Some kites use a universal control bar. This means your initial investment is higher, but when you buy your next kite you may only have to purchase the kite. The same control bar will be used with both kites.
  5. Depower kites allow the rider to sheet in and sheet out. Similar to windsurfing or sailing, pulling the bar in increases power and letting the bar out decreases the power of the kite. With a depower (sheet-able) kite there is little to no pull on the bar. The power and pull of the kite is transferred to your harness. The center lines pass through the center of the control bar and are attached to your harness by a mechanical device called a chicken loop.
  6. The average entry level snowkiting package (kite, control bar, harness, and leash) costs between $900 to $1,800+. The brand, type of kite, and kites size will have the biggest impact on the cost.
  7. De-power kites over 5 square meters are best for snow-kiting.
  8. De-power kites are the safest and smoothest flying kites.


Kites to Buy for Snowkiting

  • Flysurfer Viron – Our most popular kite for snowkiting – Closed Cell – Land and Water

Sizes: 2.5m, 4m, 6m, 8m

This is one of the most versatile, highest quality, easy to use 4-line depower beginner kites on the market. Whether you are looking to learn kiteboarding or snowkiting or both, this kite is an excellent choice. The kite is a super-high quality closed cell foil that is specifically designed for new kiters. The different sizes offer a huge range of potential. If kiteboarding is your ambition, this kite is fantastic. The kite is sold with the control bar and lines. The lines can be shortened to half length for your first practice sessions, making your first flights safer with less power. The lines can be quickly lengthened to the full length when you are ready for full power. For water and snow snowkiting, this kite is one of the best tools for learning and progressing in the sport.


Fixed Bridal Kites for Snowkiting

Other Depower Kites for Snowkiting

I WANT... a 4-line trainer kite that RIGS LIKE A FULL-SIZE kite.

Trainer Kite - 4 Line Rush V School4-Line Trainer Kites: Not for Everyone

4-Line kites are a bit more technical than 2 and 3 line kites.  Many of them require the purchase of additional gear and take more knowledge and effort to learn how to properly fly.  This is not a bad thing, but should be understood before buying. 


The Key Advantage

The key advantage to a 4-line kite is that it rigs and flies like a full-size kite.  A 4-line kite provides a great experience for practicing each step needed for flying a full-size kite: setting up, flying, launching, water launching, and landing a kite.  In addition, you are learning and practicing the same important corresponding movements of flying and sheeting (in and out).


Additional Gear Needed

  1. Kite
  2. Control bar
  3. Harness
  4. Leash
  5. Helmet (Not required but recommended)


People who may be interested in 4-Line Trainer Kites

  1. Kiteboarder who is teaching a family member or friend.
  2. A person who has taken lessons but is not ready for a full size kite.
  3. A person who has been flying a 2 or 3 fixed bridal kite and wants to go to the next level.
  4. Lightweight people or youth to use as an actual kiteboarding kite. (4 to 6m size)


The Benefit

Here are some key benefits you can learn with an inflatable 4-line kite

  • Set up like a full-size kite – kite & line position
  • Assisted launching and landing
  • Self-launch and self-landing
  • Water relaunch
  • Sheeting in & out corresponds to every aspect of flying
  • Body dragging (larger sizes 4m-6m)

Each of these elements can be learned and practiced with proper instruction.


The Added Risk

4-line trainer kites have an element of added risk.  This type of kite requires being hooked into a harness. This is required because 4-line kites are sheetable and will not operate properly without being hooked into a harness.

Warning:  Larger sizes (4-6m) 4-line kites can quickly become more dangerous.  Taking lessons is highly recommended before flying these kites!


4-Line Beginner Kites that Rig & Fly Like Full Size Kites

•  Flysurfer Viron 2.5m, 4m, 6m, 8m   •  Ocean Rodeo React II 2m   •  Ozone Uno 2.5m   •   Ozone Uno 4m  •  Ozone Uno 6m


Flysurfer Viron 2.5m, 4m, 6m, 8m

The Flysurfer Viron is one of the most versatile, highest quality, easy to use 4-line depower beginner kites on the market.  Whether you are looking to learn kiteboarding, snowkiting or both, this kite is an excellent choice.  The Flysurfer Viron is a super high quality closed cell foil that is specifically designed for new kiters and is bomb proof.

The Viron comes complete with the bar and lines.  The only additional gear you will need is a harness and leash.

The different sizes offer a huge range of potential.  If kiteboarding is your ambition, this kite is fantastic.  The kite is sold with the control bar and lines. The lines can be shortened to half length for your first practice sessions, making your first flights safer with less power. They can easily be lengthened to the full length when you are ready for full power.

For kiteboarding and snowkiting, Viron is one of the best tools for learning and progressing in the sport.


Ocean Rodeo React II 2m

The Ocean Rodeo React II is a nice little package that comes complete with everything needed to fly the kite. It is a close simulation of rigging and flying full size gear. Like other 4 - line Inflatable kites (LEI – Leading Edge Inflatable kites) launching, landing, and relaunching will take the help of an assistant. Under the right conditions you will be able to learn to self launch, land, and relaunch.

This is a great little package that is affordable and safely introduces you to rigging and flying full size gear.


Ozone Uno 2.5m, 4m, 6m

The Ozone Uno comes with the kite only. The control bar, harness, leash, and pump are sold separately. The Ozone Uno is the best Inflatable 4-line trainer kite for learning but also requires the largest up front investment.   The ability to choose from a kite from 2.5m to 6m opens up a number of options.


.

Trainer Kite Size & Power

Kite Size

Important: When comparing trainer kite sizes, compare the true size (square meters) and realize the number on the kite may not represent square meters. Full size kite sizes are most commonly referenced by their true size: 6m, 12m, 17m etc...  This number  references the kites size based on square meters.  With trainer kites, that is not always the case.  If you buy a kite that states 2m it may be referring to the wing span and not the true size.  Its actual size in square meters may only be 1.5m and therefore, it is a smaller kite.

Kite Power & Pull

Power is mostly determined by the true size of a kite in square meters and the wind speed. Line length will also impact the power a kite can generate because it impacts the speed and distance a kite can travel. Longer line length equals more power and shorter line length equals less power. 

Quick Comparison Charts

Below are a couple charts that offer a quick comparison of kite sizes and models. We only sell top quality kites to accelerate your progression in kiteboarding, snowkiting, and kite landboarding. Read about our NO BULL Guarantee.

Stars Ratings

Five Stars ***** = BEST
One Star * = LEAST

3 Line Land Trainer Kite Review ($220 - $250)

  3-Line kites are the most popular kites for learning kiteboading, kitesurfing, landboarding, longboarding, and snowkiting.

 

Features

Rush V Pro
250

Rush V Pro
300

Rush V Pro
350

Ignition
1.6m

Ignition
2m

Ignition
2.5m

Ignition
3m

Picture Link

rush-v-pro-250-trainer-kite-review-cl125.jpg

Rush V Pro 300 Trainer Kite

 Rush V Pro 350 Trainer Kite

Ozone Ignition 1.6m - 3 line Kiteboarding Trainer Kite Review

Ozone Ignition 1.8m - 3 line Kiteboarding Trainer Kite Review

Ozone Ignition 2m - 3 line Kiteboarding Trainer Kite Review

Ozone Ignition 3m - 3 line Kiteboarding Trainer Kite Review

Price

$218.49

$246.99

$275.99

199.99

$219.99

$239.99

$259.99

True Size (Square Meters)

2m

2.8m

3.5m

1m

1.5m

2.5m

2.9m

Span (length)

250cm

300cm

350cm

160cm

200cm

250cm

300cm

Most Popular

 ***  *****  **** ***  *** ***  ***

Quality

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Power

Light

Medium

Strong

Very Light

Light

Medium

Medium

Depower

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Self-Launch / Relaunch

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Water Relaunch

No

No

No

No

No

No

No

Snowkiting

No

*

***

No

No

*

*

Landboarding

*

***

***

*

*

**

**

Line Strength (lbs)

385

385

485

220

220

440

440

Line Length (ft)

65.5

65.5

65.5

59

59

59

59

Wind Range (Mph)

5-24

5-24

5-24

6-20

6-20

6-20

6-20

More Comparison Charts >>

 

View As Grid List

Back to Top